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Players

Lee C. Camp

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER, HOST, WRITER

Lee is an Alabamian by birth, has always loved music, and got the crazy idea for Tokens some years back when he realized that the musicians have been trying for centuries to sort out good ways to say all the important things theologians try to say, too; that, plus it occurred to him one day that the only job he might like more than the job he already had as a college professor would be Garrison Keillor’s job. See more on this tale on our ABOUT page. He has most recently been learning to play the upright bass. He is married to a wonderful woman named Laura, and they have three very fine sons.

Lee is Professor of Theology & Ethics at Lipscomb University in Nashville, teaching undergraduate courses as well as graduate theology seminars in the Hazelip School of Theology at Lipscomb. He completed his undergrad studies at Lipscomb (B.A., 1989), and graduate studies at Abilene Christian University (M.A., M.Div., 1993) and University of Notre Dame (M.A., 1997, Ph.D., 1999). He is the author of MERE DISCIPLESHIP: RADICAL CHRISTIANITY IN A REBELLIOUS WORLD (Brazos Press, 2003; 2nd edition, summer 2008) and WHO IS MY ENEMY:  QUESTIONS AMERICAN CHRISTIANS MUST FACE ABOUT ISLAM AND THEMSELVES (Brazos Press, 2011); plus numerous other articles.  Lee has a personal website at LEECCAMP.COM.

Jeff Taylor

Music Director

Jeff grew up in western New York playing accordion and keyboards in his dad’s band since age 10. He studied classical piano at the Eastman School of Music, and was a band leader of a small jazz/rock group in the Air Force in Ohio. He has lived in Nashville since 1990 where he has been a band leader/keyboard player/multi-instrumentalist on numerous theatre productions, live shows, and recording sessions.

Live highlights include: 2 years as bandleader at the Ryman auditorium (“Always Patsy Cline”), hundreds of shows as bandleader at Opryland theme park and the General Jackson, The Skaggs Family Christmas tour, and many appearances on the Grand Ole Opry with numerous artists.

Recording highlights have been with Amy Grant, George Strait, The Chieftains, Elvis Costello, Martina McBride, Buddy Greene, Michael Card, Vince Gill and numerous Ricky Skaggs projects and many others. Jeff was a featured artist on the Ricky Skagg’s and Kentucky Thunder Instrumental CD that won a 2007 Grammy for Best Bluegrass Album. He has a solo piano hymns CD for Cumberland records and a solo piano Christmas record also. He just completed work on a solo instrumental project entitled “Jigs, Reels, Hymns and Airs”, on which he plays several different instruments. Jeff plays accordion, concertina, penny whistles, mandolin and bouzouki with a celtic group called “The Boys of County Nashville,” which has recently released a Celtic tribute to Led Zepplin.

Jeff is also married to a fine woman named Vicki, but fortunately it’s another Vicki than Paul Smith’s wife. Jeff has three children and three grandchildren.

Pete Huttlinger

guitar, Banjo

Our friend Pete Huttlinger, part of the original Most Outstanding Horeb Mountain Boys from the very first Tokens Show in 2008, passed away January 15, 2016. We miss him, and will always remember him.

Pete Huttlinger has become widely known as one of the most awe-inspiring acoustic guitar players in the world. His unique arrangements and spell-binding musicality and precision have entertained audiences all from Los Angeles to Milan

As a recording artist Huttlinger has released numerous albums and received wide-acceptance ranging from his critically acclaimed “Naked Pop” to his current release “Fingerpicking Wonder – The Music of Stevie Wonder.” Praise from the media has been overwhelmingly positive and Huttlinger continues to expand his musical breadth.

In 2007, Huttlinger made his debut at New York City’s Carnegie Hall. He was invited back in 2008 and made his first appearance there as a solo artist demonstrating what audiences around the world know him best for – his fantastic sense of humor and mind-blowing chops all combined to make a full-on, entertaining 90 minutes of laughter and chin-dropping. In 2004 and 2007, he was invited to participate in both Eric Clapton’s Crossroads Festivals.

Huttlinger also makes appearances as a side-man. Country/pop superstar LeAnn Rimes often requests him for her acoustic performances. Some of the most recent ones include the filming of “Live From Abbey Road” a BBC TV series taped at the famous London studios. It aired in America on BRAVO! Huttlinger also appeared with Rimes on ABC’s “Dancing With The Stars” and made an acoustic recording with her that was sold as an exclusive download through Kellogg’s.

Buddy Greene

VOCALS

Buddy was born and bred in Macon, Georgia, and began playing music to local audiences by age 10.  His first big break came with an invitation to join Jerry Reed’s band, and shortly thereafter made the move to Nashville.  After touring the country, recording, and making numerous TV appearances with Reed, Buddy was given the opportunity to record an album of original gospel music which quickly brought him to the attention of gospel greats Bill & Gloria Gaither.

Through touring with the Gaithers and appearing on their Homecoming video series, as well as continuing to write and record his unique brand of gospel music, Buddy has built a solid reputation as a singer, songwriter, instrumentalist and talented performer with a distinct southern flavor.  His virtuosity on the harmonica has distinguished him as an instrumental force to be reckoned with.

Buddy’s songwriting has gained him recognition as well, especially as the co-writer of the Christmas favorite, “Mary, Did You Know?”, recorded by many of today’s top recording artists.  Buddy’s outstanding performances have taken him from Macon, GA to New York’s Central Park, music festivals, concert halls, churches, pickin’ parties of every kind, and even Carnegie Hall.

Find at more about Buddy on his website, www.buddygreene.com.

Odessa Settles

Vocals

Odessa Settles, born and raised in Nashville TN, the only sister of eight siblings, has been on stage most of her life thanks to her singing father, Walter Settles, a former member of the Fairfield Four. Odessa has served as a multi-genre artist and referral entity in Nashville for many years in the areas of vocal and instrumental music, acting, modeling, spoken word, recording projects and short films. Odessa considers herself a folk singer and novice songwriter, a lover of ukuleles and anything she can beat on (percussion, sticks, paddles, cans, buckets, tambourines, etc.). Her gift and mission in life is to minister to the sick, listen, learn, bridge gaps, sing, record, and perform with as many people as possible, and teach to others the great lessons she has learned from individuals who have allowed her to share their space.

Odessa is the coordinator and manager of: Settles Connection, a recording and performing group that consist of family and friends; Seven Brothers and One Sister, which includes the Settles brothers and Odessa; and the Nashville Symphony “Let Freedom Sing” Celebration Chorus that comes together yearly to celebrate the life and legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Odessa, now considered “a piece of the furniture” has been performing with the TOKENS Radio Show series since the first show. Odessa says, “I feel quite honored and blessed each time I am invited to share the stage with the Tokens family and friends under the direction of Lee Camp and Jeff Taylor. Each show is a lesson in collaborative creativity and fellowship from the stage to the audience.”

Byron House

Acoustic Bass

What do Emmylou Harris, Dolly Parton, Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas and Jorma Kaukonen all have in common? For one thing, they are among the most respected musicians and artists in American popular music over the last four decades. For another, they have all at one time or another sought out the services of Byron House, currently one of Nashville’s—and the country’s—hardest working bass players, both in the studio and on the road.

Versatile, tasteful, unique, spontaneous and, most of all, musical—these are the words most commonly used to describe Byron’s bass playing. But it was banjo that first inspired him to seriously pursue a musical career. His musical path got off to an auspicious beginning, when, at age 11, he met and jammed with Sam Bush, who was already a world-class mandolinist and fiddler who had only recently formed the groundbreaking New Grass Revival.

At age 17, after 7 years of honing his banjo chops (he also dabbled in guitar, dulcimer, trumpet, bassoon, percussion, piano and other instruments), Byron switched to bass, after hearing Jaco Pastorius’ revelatory bass work on Weather Report’s Heavy Weather. “I heard his playing,” Byron says, “and I realized what that instrument could do; not only play the more traditional supportive role, but also add harmony lines in a way that would not only support the melody and the other instruments but also serve as a catalyst to the other players. Yet it was so subtle and carefully played. I went home and did some woodshedding for a year, playing his records over and over.”

Other bass players that influenced Byron in his formative years include Paul McCartney, James Jamerson, Phil Lesh, Jack Casady, Ray Brown, Paul Chambers, Junior Huskey and Roy Huskey.

In the mid-1980s, Byron left his hometown of Bowling Green, Ky., and relocated to Nashville, opening up a new universe of musical possibilities. He was soon working steadily with Foster & Lloyd, and his reputation quickly spread through Music City. In addition to Parton, Harris, Kaukonen and Douglas, Byron has performed or recorded with Buddy and Julie Miller, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Linda Ronstadt, Jim Lauderdale, Dixie Chicks, Nickel Creek, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Shelby Lynne, Clay Walker, Al Kooper and Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter, to name a few. He was honored with a Grammy nomination in 2005 for his work on Mark O’Connor’s 30-Year Retrospective.

In 1999, almost 30 years after that first jam session with Sam Bush, Byron’s musical career came full-circle, when he landed the enviable bass gig in Bush’s prolific touring band. “Byron is the first choice for the upright acoustic bass,” Bush says. “He also plays just as well on the electric and fretless, which makes him as versatile as he is accomplished. With Chris Brown on drums and Byron on bass, I have a rhythm section that allows for limitless possibilities; we can play every musical genre, from reggae to bluegrass to rock. He is also a good friend and understands that being a road musician means being able to get along with your players. Byron is the best.”

Many other musicians are quick to sing Byron’s praises. “Working with Byron House is an incomparable musical experience,” Kaukonen says. “He brings so much with him when he comes. Whether you need upright, fretless or electric bass, playing with him makes you feel as if he has always been in your band and that you would be lost without him. As if that weren’t enough, you can count on him for background vocals. He is a consummate professional as well as an intuitive player. I am proud to call him a friend and a peer!”

Byron lives near Nashville with his wife, Karen, and their two sons, Truman and Henry. His musical career—tours, TV appearances and recording sessions with established stars as well as up-and-coming acts—is more fulfilling than he could have ever imagined, and he knows as well as anyone just how fortunate he is. “I consider the excitement of the work I do and the intricacies of this instrument a challenge and an inspiration,” Byron says. “As long as I can continue to be creative—whether on stage or in the studio—then I feel I’m being true to the art. Music is a special language; I appreciate what it does for people and feel I am truly blessed to be a part of that process, interacting with the artists that are dedicated to all that music means to them and their audience.”

Written by Jack Silverman
Interviews by Lynn Manderson

Greg Lee

Brother Preacher, Writer

For five years, Greg was host and contributing producer of the Emmy and Peabody award-winning PBS show, WHERE IN THE WORLD IS CARMEN SANDIEGO? He also hosted Nickelodeon’s TOTAL PANIC, ESPN’s music video show MAX OUT, several segments of NBC’s INSIDE STUFF with Ahmad Rashad, and a number of specials for SHOWTIME.  For 6 years he co-hosted the NBA’s “Stay In School Spectacular” for NBC, working with Sinbad, Queen Latifa, Mary J. Blige, Boys II Men, and Wil Smith.

As an actor, Greg has appeared on THE GEORGE LOPEZ SHOW, THE DISTRICT, THE DREW CAREY SHOW, NEWSRADIO, MAD ABOUT YOU, SESAME STREET, GHOST WRITER, and WORLD CUP COMEDY as well as many TV and radio commercials for HONDA, SUBARU, NESTLE’S, SOUTHWEST AIRLINES, OFFICE DEPOT, DELTA AIRLINES, DELL COMPUTERS, BUICK, MITSUBISHI, SPRINT, McDONALD’S, CHARLES SCHWAB and others.

Greg starred in the independent films INTERVIEWING GOD and CHAOS THEORY, and appeared with Katharine Ross in EYE OF THE DOLPHIN, and it’s sequel, BENEATH THE BLUE.  Last year he wrote, produced and starred in the short, dark comedy film, KILLER.

For many years Greg was the voice of Principal (Mayor) White on the Award-winning cartoon, DOUG.  He also voiced several episodes of THE E! HOLLYWOOD TRUE STORY, various DOCUMENTARIES, the video cartoon series HOOP DOGS, and a special for the SUNDANCE INSTITUTE with Robert Redford.

After sharing the stage with such notable improvisers as Fred Willard, Wayne Brady, and Edie McClure, Greg developed his own improvisation-based creative training course called “Throw The Bunny”, for MATTEL, DISNEY, IDEO, PROCTOR & GAMBLE, THE AMERICAN FILM INSTITUTE, J.W. TUMBLES and OLD NAVY.

Greg has written for DOUG, P.B. & J. OTTER, THE SUNDANCE CHANNEL, MATTEL, THE LONGABERGER COMPANY, DISNEY, PBS, ESPN ZONE, J.W. TUMBLES, PROCTOR AND GAMBLE, LUCASTUDIOS and FOX.  He’s also written and produced music for NICKELODEON, DISNEY, PBS and MATTEL.

Greg wrote, produced and performed three one-man shows entitled, SATAN’S IN THE TOASTER, CONVERSATIONAL INSANITY, and WHEN BAD THINGS HAPPEN TO GOOD SERMONS.  He recently recorded a collection of his own original music with JEFF TAYLOR and OUR MOST OUTSTANDING HOREB MOUNTAIN BOYS.

For the last couple of years, Greg‘s BROTHER PREACHER character has been confusing, offending and occasionally delighting live audiences all over the country, including 2 tours with THE APOSTLES OF COMEDY, appearing with RICKY SKAGGS at The Ryman Auditorium, and of course, here at TOKENS.  Every day Brother Preacher can be found “Bleaching” (Blog-Preaching) online at THE SEMI-DAILY PREACHER.  You’ve been warned.

Aubrey Haynie

Fiddle, Mandolin

When he was nine years old, Aubrey Haynie picked up a fiddle, figuring it was the best choice among the various instruments his grandfather had urged him to learn. Artists from George Jones to Justin Timberlake have since reaped the benefits of that choice. To see Haynie play is to witness a man swept away by music.

Haynie’s zeal for discovering every note, tone and inflection the fiddle has to offer has paired him with world-renowned artists of every musical genre and taken him from the stage of the Grand Ole Opry to the stage sets of David Letterman and Jay Leno to center stage at the largest church in America. He was twice winner of the Academy of Country Music’s Fiddle Player of the Year award and is up in 2008 for the ACM’s Specialty Instrument honor.

As a member of Nashville’s fabled ad hoc band, The Time Jumpers, Haynie was nominated for two Grammys. And his 2003 collection, The Bluegrass Fiddle Album, won the International Bluegrass Music Association’s (IBMA) Instrumental Album of the Year prize.

Once the young Tampa native decided he might have a future with the fiddle, he signed up for one lesson a week. It was hardly a fast-track commitment, but his aptitude for fiddle-playing was so strong that it soon propelled him into the spotlight. “I’d learn a lesson on Monday night,” he recalls, “and then every Thursday night I’d jam at a place called the Bluegrass Parlor.” After he made $100 playing a date with the Parlor’s house band, Haynie was hooked. “I was like 10 years old, and I’m thinking to myself, ‘This is gonna work.’” Haynie’s skill with the fiddle transferred naturally to the mandolin, and before long he was well on his way to mastering that instrument as well.

While he was still in junior high school, Haynie won the Florida state fiddling championship two years in a row. In that same period, he also journeyed to Nashville, where he placed third in the Grand Masters Fiddle Contest. During the trip, he met Mark O’Connor, a former child prodigy who had by then become the most in-demand fiddle player in Music City. Years later, after he had moved to Nashville permanently, Haynie was the last student to take private lessons under O’Connor before the maestro departed to work in other music capitals. Haynie has since taught several summers at O’Connor’s annual fiddle camp.

As a teenage on the Florida bluegrass circuit, Haynie encountered the great bluegrass fiddler, Chubby Wise. In his prime, Wise had toured and made classic recordings with the likes of Bill Monroe, Flatt & Scruggs and Hank Snow. “He and his wife would travel around in a station wagon,” Haynie explains, “but he would never carry a band with him. He would just get whoever was available at the festival to back him. So sometimes I’d play guitar or mandolin with him for his fiddle show. He was one of my first bluegrass fiddle heroes. When Ricky Skaggs came to Florida, I got to meet his fiddler, Bobby Hicks. I also met Stuart Duncan when he was playing with Larry Sparks. I think I was about 10 when that happened. Bobby and Stuart became role models, too.”

In addition, Haynie fell under the artistic sway of Bill Monroe’s great sideman, Kenny Baker. “He was a huge influence on me. I bought every one of Kenny’s records, and I’m still listening to and learning from them.”

After taking night classes to complete high school early, Haynie returned to Nashville in 1991 to audition for Aaron Tippin’s band. He was only 17 then and too young to be legal in some of the clubs Tippin had booked. But he still got the job. Two years later, he moved on to Clint Black’s band. Then, in 1995, Haynie left Black and the road to become a full-time studio musician.

“I did a show on the General Jackson showboat in Nashville when I was working with Clint,” Haynie says. “Garth Fundis, who’d produced Keith Whitley and Trisha Yearwood, was there, as was Sam Bush, who’s a fine fiddler himself. Sam knew I’d been studying with Mark O’Connor, and I think he may have suggested that Garth listen to me play. In any case, within a month of that show, Garth’s office called and hired me to play on Trisha’s Thinkin’ About You album.”

When Black and his producer, James Stroud, decided to use Black’s road band to record his One Emotion album, Stroud was so impressed by Haynie’s work that he began booking him to do sessions with other artists. From that point on, Haynie has been a first-call studio player.

Among the dozens of country acts Haynie has recorded with are Willie Nelson, Ray Price, Merle Haggard, Alabama, Reba McEntire, Tim McGraw, Faith Hill, Keith Urban, Dolly Parton, Gene Watson, Shania Twain, the Whites, Martina McBride, Sara Evans, Eddie Rabbitt, Randy Travis, Josh Turner, Trace Adkins, Dierks Bentley, LeAnn Rimes, Steve Wariner, Travis Tritt, Brooks & Dunn, Toby Keith, Kenny Rogers, Kenny Chesney, the Oak Ridge Boys, Joe Diffie, Daryle Singletary, Lee Ann Womack, Hal Ketchum, Carrie Underwood, Tracy Byrd, Lonestar, SheDaisy, Brad Paisley, Billy Ray Cyrus, Jerry Reed, Darryl Worley, Blake Shelton, Wynonna, George Jones, Ricky Skaggs, Porter Wagoner, Tracy Lawrence, Pam Tillis and Jo Dee Messina.

He numbers among his pop and rock clients such stars as Kelly Clarkson, Justin Timberlake, John Mellencamp, Darius Rucker (of Hootie & The Blowfish), Bob Seger, Mark Knopfler, Livingston Taylor and Kid Rock. His gospel accounts include the Gaither Vocal Band, Dottie Rambo, Gold City, Buddy Greene, Janet Pascal, the Isaacs and Jeff and Sheri Easter.

It was a smooth switch from touring to recording, says Haynie. “I loved it. I just took to it immediately. I love being able to play something and then listen back to it and try to make it better, to be constantly critiquing myself. I’m very thankful and count it a blessing to be making a living doing what I love. I’ve never taken it for granted that I have the opportunity of working with some of the best musicians in the world.”

Rare though it is, Haynie does return to the road now and then, usually just on weekends and just to help a friend or an act he admires. He plays a few bluegrass festivals each year. Of these, his pick is the annual Musicians Against Childhood Cancer Bluegrass Classic in Columbus, Ohio, which raises funds for the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The Celebration Of Life, an album made up of tracks recorded at previous MACC events, won the IBMA’s Album of the Year trophy in 2006.

Haynie has released three of his own albums on Sugar Hill Records: Doin’ My Time (1997), A Man Must Carry On (2000) and the award-winning The Bluegrass Fiddle Album, all of which he produced.

On most Monday evenings, Haynie does his fancy fiddling with The Time Jumpers at Nashville’s Station Inn bluegrass club. The group is made up of touring and studio musicians who enjoy jamming with each other in their off hours. Haynie was with the original Jumpers when they formed in the mid ‘90s and returned to the group as a steady member three years ago.

In 2006, Haynie added film to his musical credits after he was picked to play on the soundtrack of the Toby Keith-Kelly Preston film, Broken Bridges. Recognizing his importance to the country music scene, Music Row magazine awarded Haynie its Fiddler of the Year prize in 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2006.

Haynie notes that one of his most uplifting experiences came when he was chosen to perform “Amazing Grace” on the fiddle at the grand opening of the Lakewood Church in Houston in 2005. With a membership of 47,000, it is the largest church in America. “Being a Christian who’s admired Joel Osteen’s positive approach to preaching the gospel for years,” Haynie says, “I was overjoyed to be a part of this.”

As might be expected, Haynie is a connoisseur of fiddles, particularly old ones. “I enjoy studying their histories and learning as much as I can about each individual maker,” he says. “And I love to trade, too. I’ve got a lot of fiddle-trading buddies around the country, and they’ll call me if they find one they think I’ll like. Then the chase is on.” His current favorites are an American-made copy of a Guarneri and an 1876 George Gemunder.

These days, Haynie says he’s achieved a satisfying balance between musical exploration and preservation. “It’s important that I do my part to uphold Nashville’s reputation for innovative fiddling,” he observes, “but I also spend a lot of time rediscovering and learning all I can from the older generations of musicians of all styles. Actually, I find that these two interests fit together perfectly.”

When he was nine years old, Aubrey Haynie picked up a fiddle, figuring it was the best choice among the various instruments his grandfather had urged him to learn. Artists from George Jones to Justin Timberlake have since reaped the benefits of that choice. To see Haynie play is to witness a man swept away by music.

Haynie’s zeal for discovering every note, tone and inflection the fiddle has to offer has paired him with world-renowned artists of every musical genre and taken him from the stage of the Grand Ole Opry to the stage sets of David Letterman and Jay Leno to center stage at the largest church in America. He was twice winner of the Academy of Country Music’s Fiddle Player of the Year award and is up in 2008 for the ACM’s Specialty Instrument honor.

As a member of Nashville’s fabled ad hoc band, The Time Jumpers, Haynie was nominated for two Grammys. And his 2003 collection, The Bluegrass Fiddle Album, won the International Bluegrass Music Association’s (IBMA) Instrumental Album of the Year prize.

Once the young Tampa native decided he might have a future with the fiddle, he signed up for one lesson a week. It was hardly a fast-track commitment, but his aptitude for fiddle-playing was so strong that it soon propelled him into the spotlight. “I’d learn a lesson on Monday night,” he recalls, “and then every Thursday night I’d jam at a place called the Bluegrass Parlor.” After he made $100 playing a date with the Parlor’s house band, Haynie was hooked. “I was like 10 years old, and I’m thinking to myself, ‘This is gonna work.’” Haynie’s skill with the fiddle transferred naturally to the mandolin, and before long he was well on his way to mastering that instrument as well.

While he was still in junior high school, Haynie won the Florida state fiddling championship two years in a row. In that same period, he also journeyed to Nashville, where he placed third in the Grand Masters Fiddle Contest. During the trip, he met Mark O’Connor, a former child prodigy who had by then become the most in-demand fiddle player in Music City. Years later, after he had moved to Nashville permanently, Haynie was the last student to take private lessons under O’Connor before the maestro departed to work in other music capitals. Haynie has since taught several summers at O’Connor’s annual fiddle camp.

As a teenage on the Florida bluegrass circuit, Haynie encountered the great bluegrass fiddler, Chubby Wise. In his prime, Wise had toured and made classic recordings with the likes of Bill Monroe, Flatt & Scruggs and Hank Snow. “He and his wife would travel around in a station wagon,” Haynie explains, “but he would never carry a band with him. He would just get whoever was available at the festival to back him. So sometimes I’d play guitar or mandolin with him for his fiddle show. He was one of my first bluegrass fiddle heroes. When Ricky Skaggs came to Florida, I got to meet his fiddler, Bobby Hicks. I also met Stuart Duncan when he was playing with Larry Sparks. I think I was about 10 when that happened. Bobby and Stuart became role models, too.”

In addition, Haynie fell under the artistic sway of Bill Monroe’s great sideman, Kenny Baker. “He was a huge influence on me. I bought every one of Kenny’s records, and I’m still listening to and learning from them.”

After taking night classes to complete high school early, Haynie returned to Nashville in 1991 to audition for Aaron Tippin’s band. He was only 17 then and too young to be legal in some of the clubs Tippin had booked. But he still got the job. Two years later, he moved on to Clint Black’s band. Then, in 1995, Haynie left Black and the road to become a full-time studio musician.

“I did a show on the General Jackson showboat in Nashville when I was working with Clint,” Haynie says. “Garth Fundis, who’d produced Keith Whitley and Trisha Yearwood, was there, as was Sam Bush, who’s a fine fiddler himself. Sam knew I’d been studying with Mark O’Connor, and I think he may have suggested that Garth listen to me play. In any case, within a month of that show, Garth’s office called and hired me to play on Trisha’s Thinkin’ About You album.”

When Black and his producer, James Stroud, decided to use Black’s road band to record his One Emotion album, Stroud was so impressed by Haynie’s work that he began booking him to do sessions with other artists. From that point on, Haynie has been a first-call studio player.

Among the dozens of country acts Haynie has recorded with are Willie Nelson, Ray Price, Merle Haggard, Alabama, Reba McEntire, Tim McGraw, Faith Hill, Keith Urban, Dolly Parton, Gene Watson, Shania Twain, the Whites, Martina McBride, Sara Evans, Eddie Rabbitt, Randy Travis, Josh Turner, Trace Adkins, Dierks Bentley, LeAnn Rimes, Steve Wariner, Travis Tritt, Brooks & Dunn, Toby Keith, Kenny Rogers, Kenny Chesney, the Oak Ridge Boys, Joe Diffie, Daryle Singletary, Lee Ann Womack, Hal Ketchum, Carrie Underwood, Tracy Byrd, Lonestar, SheDaisy, Brad Paisley, Billy Ray Cyrus, Jerry Reed, Darryl Worley, Blake Shelton, Wynonna, George Jones, Ricky Skaggs, Porter Wagoner, Tracy Lawrence, Pam Tillis and Jo Dee Messina.

He numbers among his pop and rock clients such stars as Kelly Clarkson, Justin Timberlake, John Mellencamp, Darius Rucker (of Hootie & The Blowfish), Bob Seger, Mark Knopfler, Livingston Taylor and Kid Rock. His gospel accounts include the Gaither Vocal Band, Dottie Rambo, Gold City, Buddy Greene, Janet Pascal, the Isaacs and Jeff and Sheri Easter.

It was a smooth switch from touring to recording, says Haynie. “I loved it. I just took to it immediately. I love being able to play something and then listen back to it and try to make it better, to be constantly critiquing myself. I’m very thankful and count it a blessing to be making a living doing what I love. I’ve never taken it for granted that I have the opportunity of working with some of the best musicians in the world.”

Rare though it is, Haynie does return to the road now and then, usually just on weekends and just to help a friend or an act he admires. He plays a few bluegrass festivals each year. Of these, his pick is the annual Musicians Against Childhood Cancer Bluegrass Classic in Columbus, Ohio, which raises funds for the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The Celebration Of Life, an album made up of tracks recorded at previous MACC events, won the IBMA’s Album of the Year trophy in 2006.

Haynie has released three of his own albums on Sugar Hill Records: Doin’ My Time (1997), A Man Must Carry On (2000) and the award-winning The Bluegrass Fiddle Album, all of which he produced.

On most Monday evenings, Haynie does his fancy fiddling with The Time Jumpers at Nashville’s Station Inn bluegrass club. The group is made up of touring and studio musicians who enjoy jamming with each other in their off hours. Haynie was with the original Jumpers when they formed in the mid ‘90s and returned to the group as a steady member three years ago.

In 2006, Haynie added film to his musical credits after he was picked to play on the soundtrack of the Toby Keith-Kelly Preston film, Broken Bridges. Recognizing his importance to the country music scene, Music Row magazine awarded Haynie its Fiddler of the Year prize in 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2006.

Haynie notes that one of his most uplifting experiences came when he was chosen to perform “Amazing Grace” on the fiddle at the grand opening of the Lakewood Church in Houston in 2005. With a membership of 47,000, it is the largest church in America. “Being a Christian who’s admired Joel Osteen’s positive approach to preaching the gospel for years,” Haynie says, “I was overjoyed to be a part of this.”

As might be expected, Haynie is a connoisseur of fiddles, particularly old ones. “I enjoy studying their histories and learning as much as I can about each individual maker,” he says. “And I love to trade, too. I’ve got a lot of fiddle-trading buddies around the country, and they’ll call me if they find one they think I’ll like. Then the chase is on.” His current favorites are an American-made copy of a Guarneri and an 1876 George Gemunder.

These days, Haynie says he’s achieved a satisfying balance between musical exploration and preservation. “It’s important that I do my part to uphold Nashville’s reputation for innovative fiddling,” he observes, “but I also spend a lot of time rediscovering and learning all I can from the older generations of musicians of all styles. Actually, I find that these two interests fit together perfectly.”

Chris Brown

Drums, Percussion

After arriving from New York in 1992, Chris has been one of the most sought-after jazz drummers in the South. He has recorded and played with many great musicians while in Nashville. Chris's first professional big band gig was with the Maynard Ferguson Band, and he has also played with Don Grolnick. A native of Albuquerque, New Mexico, Chris graduated from North Texas State with a Bachelors of Music degree in Jazz Studies. Besides being one of Nashville's top session drummers, Chris tours with Sam Bush and performs regularly with the Beegie Adair Trio.

Phil Barnett

Production Manager

A facilitator between the creative and the technical, Phil Barnett brings a broad knowledge of the staging business to your organization. Drawing upon 20 years of experience in live event production and recording studio operations, Phil is able to transform your ideas into breathtaking reality. Onsite diplomacy during stressful situations is his trademark.

Phil’s professional career began as a recording engineer/archivist for Iliad, Inc., while attending Belmont University, earning him credits on multiple gold and platinum albums produced for companies such as Victoria’s Secret and Hallmark. Upon graduation with a BBA, Phil accepted a position with Nomad Productions, providing staging services to organizations ranging from Motorola to Coca-Cola and various country and pop artists. Next, Phil took on the challenge of production manager for Integrity Events, specializing in providing top-name entertainment to high profile corporate clients. In 2000, Phil accepted a position with his former employer, Iliad, Inc., managing the technical needs for the audio, IT, and graphic departments.

Upon the sale of Iliad, Inc., Phil launched Stonebrook Media, which is now highly sought after by meeting planners, event producers, marketing departments, churches, and artists for its technical direction and audio/visual contracting expertise.